UK coronavirus cases up by nearly 61,000 in new record high as Covid deaths surge by 830

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he UK has recorded 60,916 coronavirus cases overnight – the highest daily figure to date.

It is the first time the figure has exceeded 60,000 in 24 hours.

It takes the total number of infections recorded across Britain since the start of the pandemic to 2,774,479.

The Government also said a further 830 people had died within 28 days of testing positive for Covid-19 as of Monday, bringing the official national total to 76,305.

However, separate figures published by the UK’s statistics agencies, together with additional data on deaths that have occurred in recent days, show there have now been more than 92,000 deaths involving the virus in the UK.

Responding to the latest figures, Public Health England’s medical director Dr Yvonne Doyle said: “The rapid rise in cases is highly concerning and will sadly mean yet more pressure on our health services in the depths of winter.

“That is why if we can, we must stay at home, reduce contacts and do everything possible to break the spread of this virus.

“It is by no means easy, but now more than ever we must all do our part to protect the NHS and save lives.”

The sobering update comes as people in England adapt to life under national lockdown for the third time.

“We will keep these constantly under review, but we can’t predict with certainty that we will be able to lift restrictions in the week commencing February 15-22,” he told Sky News.

“What we will be doing is everything that we can to make sure that as many people as possible are vaccinated, so that we can begin to progressively lift restrictions.

“I think it is right to say that, as we enter March, we should be able to lift some of these restrictions, but not necessarily all.”

All you need to know about the new national lockdown

It includes one-off top-up grants worth up to £9,000 for firms in the retail, hospitality and leisure sectors to help nurse them through to the spring.

The Chancellor was forced to defend himself and Mr Johnson against allegations that they have consistently been behind the curve on decision-making, telling reporters: “The Prime Minister has acted decisively in the face of new information.”

Mr Sunak also said he would “take stock” of government support packages in March’s Budget, when pressed on whether he would extend the furlough scheme to prevent a wave of business closures and redundancies.

Mr Johnson’s announcement came after First Minister Nicola Sturgeon imposed a lockdown on Scotland for the rest of January, with a legal requirement to stay at home and schools closed to most pupils until February.

Schools and colleges in Wales will also remain closed until at least January 18 and move to online learning, while in Northern Ireland – which is already under a six-week lockdown – “stay at home” restrictions will be brought back into law and a period of remote learning for schoolchildren will be extended.

The Stormont Executive is meeting on Tuesday to confirm details of the plan, which could run beyond January.

In his address, Mr Johnson warned the coming weeks will be the “hardest yet” but said that “with a fair wind in our sails” it should be possible to vaccinate 13 million of the most vulnerable people by mid-February, paving the way for controls to be eased.

The Prime Minister had previously strongly resisted calls to delay the reopening of primary schools in particular following the Christmas break – despite pressure from the teaching unions.

Mr Gove said they had been forced to act with a “heavy heart” after the chief medical officers of the four nations warned there was a danger the NHS would be overwhelmed by the surge in infections caused by the new variant of Covid-19.

“In the circumstances we felt that the only thing we could do was to close those primary schools that were open,” he said.

With the Government acknowledging that exams in England will not be able to go ahead as planned in the summer, Education Secretary Gavin Williamson will address a recalled House of Commons on Wednesday to update MPs on how pupils will be assessed.

With MPs due to debate the new restrictions on Wednesday, Labour leader Sir Keir Starmer confirmed his party would support the Government.

He warned however that meeting Mr Johnson’s target of vaccinating 13 million people by mid-February – including all over-70s – would not be easy.

“That’s the ambition of the Prime Minister. I hope he is not overpromising. It’s going to be a struggle and we need to make this work,” he said.

Meanwhile, some doctors and scientists expressed concern that the latest measures would still not be enough to prevent the NHS being overwhelmed.

Dr Claudia Paoloni, chairwoman of the Hospital Consultants and Specialists Association, told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme: “We’re now in a situation where the risk of overwhelming the NHS at this point, over the next few weeks, is very, very high.”

Professor Andrew Hayward, a member of the Government’s Scientific Advisory Group for Emergencies (Sage), said it was important to learn lessons from the first wave of the pandemic.

“I think the lockdown announced yesterday will clearly save tens of thousands of lives. The threat we’re facing is at least as bad as we were back in March,” he told the Today programme.

“I think the virus is different and it may be that the lockdown measures we had are not enough, so we need to learn from the new insights and new technologies, we need to learn from the last lockdown and particularly some of the things we saw.”